2019 Western Psychological Association (Pasadena, CA)

2019 WPA w/ LarisaIn examining whether mindfulness fits in the context of approach and avoidance coping framework, Larisa found that indicators associated with mindfulness and approach coping loaded on a single factor, and only avoidance uniquely predicted physical and mental health. The results of the study are important for setting ground for futurework investigating mindfulness in the context of coping literature.

Gavrilova, L., & Zawadzki, M. J. (April 2019). Testing the effects of avoidance, approach, and mindful coping approaches on mental and physical health. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Pasadena, CA.

 

Herring-Alderete, S., Sanchez, S., Gavrilova, L. G., & Zawadzki, M. J. (April 2019). The effects of positive versus negative cognitive patterns on anxiety and depression in college students. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Pasadena, CA.
 
Sydney examined the relationships between negative (e.g., rumination) and positive (e.g., reflection) cognitive processes with mental health. Results suggested that negative cognitive processes more consistently predicted greater depression and anxiety highlighting the need to focus intervention efforts on these cognitive styles. (Larisa and Matthew presented the poster.)

 

Elizabeth examined how subjective social status (SSS) – or the perception of one’s rank relative to others – affected mental health for college students. SSS about one’s family when growing up was related to better health for freshman students only, suggesting this as an important resource when students transition from home to college life.

Ochoa Sierra, E., Kim, W. K., & Zawadzki, M. J. (April 2019). Comparing objective and subjective social status relationships with mental health by age for college students. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Pasadena, CA.

 

Garcia, P., & Zawadzki, M. J. (April 2019). Social support buffers depression particularly for Hispanics. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Western Psychological Association, Pasadena, CA.
 

Building from work showing the importance of social connections among Hispanics, Pedro’s poster found that social support more strongly predicted lower depression for Hispanics than non-Hispanics. These results suggest the importance of considering the cultural context of patients when designing factors to promote health, including in developing treatment plans and designing implementations.

 

From left to right: Elizabeth, Pedro, and Larisa.

 

The Stress and Health Lab visiting their academic grandfather, Dr. William Gerin (left).              From left to right: Dr. William Gerin, Matthew, Larisa, Elizabeth, and Pedro.